rramos Annotations

What kinds of information relevant to a community's vulnerability or resilience are unavailable or inaccessible?

Monday, April 23, 2018 - 11:04pm

This article did not talk about how much newark is polluted, in comparison to social implications. Granted this article was about a passed government action, there was information I probably wasn't shown that was taken into consideration.

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What social processes are creating vulnerability? What is their history?

Monday, April 23, 2018 - 10:59pm

One process to consider is that alot of Newark Environmental and Public Health laws had not been changed since the 1950's, so that allowed for continuing of neglegence over the course of history in terms of environmental justice. Other social processes that might have played a part is race and class. Low-rise and dense housing for low-income and minority civilians have become major victims of careless industrialization.

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How are agencies/companies helping to minimize this hazard.

Monday, April 23, 2018 - 10:54pm

A process is placed that allows for social justice to take place in the development phase. 

"Commercial and Industrial developers have to go through the following process when proposing for a building: 

  1. Reference the city’s ERI and prepare a checklist of pollutants
  2. Submit checklist and development application to the city
  3. Checklist goes to the Environmental Commission
  4. Checklist goes to the Planning or Zoning Board (where appropriate)

The public has full access to this checklist to weigh in on it and make their voices heard." 

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What is the policy and what does it aim to achieve?

Monday, April 23, 2018 - 10:51pm

The policy is to have stronger land use and environmental rules on a local level. It aims to mitigate use of pollutants, and give careful attention to low-income, minority citizens as to not pollute their communities.

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What three points, details or references from the article did you follow up on to advance your understanding of the issues and actors described in the article?

Monday, April 16, 2018 - 9:15pm

The first point that peaked my interest is when Dr. Nicky Sheats brought up the real world example of a powerplant that was placed in the Ironbound District. It's an example of how government standards don't reflect or align with individual standards. I thought this was interesting to see how the people didn't have their due justice in deciding to have a polluting plant in their neighborhood. The other fact that caught my eye is that Newark zoning laws, previous to being updated in 2012, had been grandfathered in since 1954. This goes to show the complete lack of awareness for public health that has resided in New Jersey's History. The last point that truly shaped this article is how steps were being taken to prevent environmental justice issues. Commercial and Industrial developers have to go through the following process when proposing for a building: "

  1. Reference the city’s ERI and prepare a checklist of pollutants
  2. Submit checklist and development application to the city
  3. Checklist goes to the Environmental Commission
  4. Checklist goes to the Planning or Zoning Board (where appropriate)

The public has full access to this checklist to weigh in on it and make their voices heard." 

Creative Commons Licence