FORMOSA
PLASTICS
ARCHIVE

台灣塑膠檔案館

CITE AS

Tim SchützShan-Ya SuDiane Wilson, Wen-Ling Tu and Kim Fortun. 2020. Formosa Plastics Archive. Disaster STS Research Network.

Illustration by Kora Fortun.

about

This is a growing collection of reports, images and videos documenting the operations of the global petrochemical company Formosa Plastics. 

The archive supports critical disaster and civic data research in the projects Quotidian Anthropocenes and the Transnational Disaster STS COVID-19 Project.

The material is also used for teaching case studies for the course Environmental Injustice.

「台灣塑膠檔案」匯集跨國石化企業台塑公司在不同國家場址運作的視覺化紀錄,媒材包含報告書、影像、動態影音。本檔案支持「日常人類世」(Quotidian Anthropocenes)和「跨國災難科技與社會Covid-19」(Transnational Disaster STS COVID-19 Project) 研究計畫研究;素材亦用於「環境不正義」(Environmental Injustice)課程案例。

CONTACT

If you would like to learn more or get involved, email Tim Schütz (tschuetz@uci.edu) or Sonia Su (soniasysu@gmail.com

DEUTERO: Who in this setting or domain is thinking and worrying about the kinds of civic [qualitative, air pollution, energy transition, anthropocene, risk] data infrastructure, work and capacity called for currently and in the future?

META: What discourses shape the way people in this setting talk about and conceptualize civic data infrastructure and capacity, right-to-know, freedom of information, the potential of expanded public participation, and so on?

MACRO: What laws and economic drivers produce (or undercut) civic data infrastructure, access, work and capacity in this setting?

MESO: What groups, networks and publics are implicated in civic data infrastructure, work, governance and capacity in this setting? What data and visualizations of these groups and networks are available?

MICRO: What practices produce (or undercut) civic data work and capacity in this setting? 

BIO: How has civic data capacity (or lack of) impacted people in this setting (subjecting them to industrial risks,  for example to over-research or invisibility? What human health impacts and indicators need to be accounted for and addressed in this setting?

NANO: What cultural frames and dispositions enable or deflect civic data work and capacity in this setting?

EDXU: What educational and research programs (formal and informal) produce civic data capacity in this setting? What data expertise is available?

DATA: What civic data and communication infrastructure is in place in this setting and how is it configured, accessible and usable?  What data, infrastructure and visualization capacity is provided by federal government actors, lower level government actors, businesses, NGOs and other civil society organizations and networks?

TECHNO: What technical infrastructure in this setting needs to be monitored, governed and planned, and what civic data infrastructure is needed for this?

ECO-ATMO: What ecosystems in this setting need to be monitoring, governed and planned, and what civic data infrastructure is needed for this? What civic data infrastructure needed to account and plan for climate change in this setting?

GEO: What Anthropocenic load (toxic waste sites, mercury levels in lakes and streams, etc) in this setting needs to be documented, stewarded and governed, and what civic data infrastructure is needed for this?

places

Taiwan

- Mailiao

- Taisi

- Dacheng

- Kaohsiung

United States

- Sunshine Bridge

Vietnam

key actors

Diane Wilson

  1. What is the setting of this case?  What are its assets? 
  2. What environmental health threats (from explosions,  everyday pollution,  climate change, etc) are there in this setting? 
  3. What intersecting factors -- social, cultural, political, technological, ecological -- contribute to environmental health vulnerability and injustice in this setting? 
  4. Who are stakeholders, what are their characteristics, and what are their perceptions of the problems?
  5. What have different stakeholder groups done (or not done) in response to the problems in this case? 
  6. How have environmental problems in this setting been reported by media, environmental groups, companies and government agencies? 
  7. What local actions would reduce environmental vulnerability and injustice in this setting?
  8. What extra-local actions (at state, national or international levels) would reduce environmental vulnerability and injustice in this setting and similar settings?
  9. What kinds of data and research would be useful in efforts to characterize and address environmental threats in this setting and similar settings? 
  10. What, in your view, is ethically wrong or unjust in this case?