Teaching Environmental Injustice: Collaborative commitments and graduate work in American anthropology (Prerna Srigyan)

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Teaching of anthropology produces a grammar of labour within graduate school: coursework/fieldwork, fieldworker/interlocutor, assisting/researching, advisor/advisee, dissertation/monograph. What kind of collaborative commitments are thought and practiced within this grammar, and to what purpose? I discuss the case of teaching an undergraduate course Environmental Injustice (EiJ). Students in the course work in groups of 10-15 over six weeks through the quarter to develop three case studies. What does this sensibility foresee and what does it preclude? What tactics are evolved towards which ends? How do these tactics intervene in the grammar of labour within anthropology graduate school? 

 

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January 1, 2021 - 11:47pm

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Srigyan, Prerna. 2021. Teaching Environmental Injustice: Collaborative commitments and graduate work in American anthropology. Abstract for 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology, March 22-27, 2021.

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Prerna Srigyan, "Teaching Environmental Injustice: Collaborative commitments and graduate work in American anthropology (Prerna Srigyan)", contributed by Prerna Srigyan, Disaster STS Network, Platform for Experimental Collaborative Ethnography, last modified 2 January 2021, accessed 12 August 2022. https://disaster-sts-network.org/content/teaching-environmental-injustice-collaborative-commitments-and-graduate-work-american