New Orleans

New Orleans Anthropocene Welcome Session

7:30-9:00pm: New Orleans Campus Welcome Session (informal snacks and drinks) Location: Cosimo’s Bar 1201 Burgundy St, New Orleans, LA 70116, USARead more
First Slavery, Then a Chemical Plant and Cancer Deaths: One Town's Brutal History

This Guardian article by Jamiles Lartey explores the history pervasive racial and environmental inequality in Saint John the Baptist parish, from slavery to the modern day. It Highlights Belle Pointe Plantation, which became a Du Pont refinery.Read more

Plantation Legacies

This essay from Edge Effects examines the plantation as transformational in the history of organizing life, land and labor. It looks at conversations around racialized violence, land alienation, and species loss as recurrent themes of the "Plantationocene."Read more

NEW ORLEANS ANTHROPOCENE FIELD CAMPUS DAY 4

Making and Doing Morning Open 1:15-5:30pm Making and Doing Session “Narrating Anthropocenes” at 4S 1:15-4:00pm Make-Your-Own Anthropocene Field Campus 4:00-5:30pm Concluding Discussion 7:00-9:00 STS Underground Symposium: Petrochemicals and Citizen Science Location: Tulane River and Coastal Center...Read more

NEW ORLEANS ANTHROPOCENE FIELD CAMPUS DAY 3

DAY THREE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4: 4S Session Panels + Land Use Professionals in the Anthropocene Morning: Participants will attend two panels and a networking lunch meet-up at the Society for Social Studies of Science annual meeting, focused on the Quotidian Anthropocene Project. Afternoon:...Read more

NEW ORLEANS ANTHROPOCENE FIELD CAMPUS DAY 5

The QA Project in Comparative Perspective Optional 1:00-2:30: Making and Doing Roundtable at 4S GOALS AND FOLLOW-UP The New Orleans Anthropocene Field Campus aims to produce deep understanding of New Orleans and the Mississippi River as sites of the Anthropocene, while building tactics and a...Read more

ST. Louis Field Campus Slideshow

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St. Louis Field Campus SLAPS/FUSRAP

On the first day of the field campus, we visited the St. Louis Airport Project Site (SLAPS), where we met with project managers from the Army Corps of Engineers, who are currently removing residual waste from the Mallinckrodt Chemical Company’s uranium refining during the 1940s and 1950s in St. Louis. Our discussion at SLAPS centered around the goals and frustrations of the remediation process -- a process which, already over-schedule, will likely continue for several more years.

SLAPS Toxic Train

An image of the fenced-off area and train at SLAPS.

St. Louis Field Campus Weldon Springs Interpretative Center

On day one, we visited the Weldon Spring Containment cell in St. Charles, Missouri. At the height of the Cold War’s nuclear arms race in the 1950s, Mallinckrodt relocated uranium production from downtown St. Louis to a new refinery in St. Charles. Following the plant’s closure, the site was converted into a 42-acre containment cell designed to contain 1.5 million cubic yards of radioactive material for 1,000 years. At the Weldon Springs Interpretive Center, we learned from museum guides about their methods for informing the public about the legacy of the uranium industry and nuclear waste in the St. Louis region.

 

St. Louis Field Campus Weldon Springs Interpretative Center II

On day one, we visited the Weldon Spring Containment cell in St. Charles, Missouri. At the height of the Cold War’s nuclear arms race in the 1950s, Mallinckrodt relocated uranium production from downtown St. Louis to a new refinery in St. Charles. Following the plant’s closure, the site was converted into a 42-acre containment cell designed to contain 1.5 million cubic yards of radioactive material for 1,000 years. At the Weldon Springs Interpretive Center, we learned from museum guides about their methods for informing the public about the legacy of the uranium industry and nuclear waste in the St. Louis region.

Interpretative Center Life Cycle Analysis

Photo taken at Weldon Spring Interpretive center, St. Louis, MO.

St. Louis Field Campus Weldon Springs Interpretative Center III

On day one, we visited the Weldon Spring Containment cell in St. Charles, Missouri. At the height of the Cold War’s nuclear arms race in the 1950s, Mallinckrodt relocated uranium production from downtown St. Louis to a new refinery in St. Charles. Following the plant’s closure, the site was converted into a 42-acre containment cell designed to contain 1.5 million cubic yards of radioactive material for 1,000 years. At the Weldon Springs Interpretive Center, we learned from museum guides about their methods for informing the public about the legacy of the uranium industry and nuclear waste in the St. Louis region.

Bird House at Weldon Springs Mound

Image of a bird house at Weldon Springs Mound, St. Louis, MO.

St. Louis Field Campus Weldon Springs Mound

We also visited the Weldon Spring Containment cell in St. Charles, Missouri. At the height of the Cold War’s nuclear arms race in the 1950s, Mallinckrodt relocated uranium production from downtown St. Louis to a new refinery in St. Charles. Following the plant’s closure, the site was converted into a 42-acre containment cell designed to contain 1.5 million cubic yards of radioactive material for 1,000 years. At the Weldon Springs Interpretive Center, we learned from museum guides about their methods for informing the public about the legacy of the uranium industry and nuclear waste in the St. Louis region.

St. Louis Field Campus Panel Discussion

During the field campus, we also heard from St. Louis locals about their own methods of documenting, analyzing and describing environmental issues in the region. In a discussion moderated by Tony West, director of The Safe Side of the Fence, we met with Brian Zink, an attorney at Atomic Weapons Employee Consultants; Wendy Verhoff, a historian of radioactive waste in St. Louis; and Denise Brock, the Ombudsman to National Institute for for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

The discussion centered on the legacy of uranium refining in the city, and more than half a million nuclear workers who developed exposure-related illnesses. Much of the talk focused on Denise Brock’s key role in the passage of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA). This legislation ensures that compensation and payment of medical expenses are available to workers and their families who developed illnesses due to exposure to radioactive substances at certain nuclear facilities.

St. Louis Field Campus West Lake Landfill

St. Louis West Lake landfill superfund site.

Lewis and Clark State Park

Photo of the Lewis and Clark Park in St Louis, Mo. 

Wood River Refinery Museum I

Photo of the entrance to the Wood River Refinery Museum in St. Louis, Mo.

DIY Lead Garden

A photo of the 'lead garden' created by Chris Carl (GCADD) in Granite City, IL.

Wood River Refinery Musuem II

Photo of an illustration found in Wood River Refinery Museum in St. Louis, Mo.

Mississippi / Missouri River Confluence

Photo of the confluence between Mississppi and Missouri River in St. Louis, MO.

Wood River Museum Photo Collection

Photo collection at Wood River Museum.

Wood River Refinery Museum Glass Plate

A guide at Wood River Refinery Museum holding up a glass plate.

Cahokia Mounds

Image taken at Cahokia Mounds, St. Louis, MO.

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